First Global Game Jam

I participated in my first Global Game Jam last weekend. Come to think of it, this was my first hackathon event I was a part of and I wasn’t sure what to expect from it. The event took place in 48 hours and we had to deliver a game within that time frame. So in this post, I would like to go through the thought-process of how the game came to be. Game Jams usually have prompts each year and this year the prompt was ‘Rituals’.

Once we had our prompt in place, we started brain-storming as a team to figure out how we could build a fun game around it. From the beginning, we did not want to do a regular game. We wanted to go out of the box like how everybody wants to when it comes to any event. This is us brain-storming ideas:

Prototyping

The Toy

We discussed about various rituals in different countries, went on to discussing about satanic rituals (the obvious choice), funny rituals, scary rituals and down right disgusting ones. The most interesting thing about such events is that brainstorming happens under an hour as time is of the essence. Slowly, everybody started to branch out into their own ideas and suddenly we were struck with this idea of the tooth-fairy legend – about how the tooth fairy picks up teeth that has fallen off and inturn leaves money under the pillow. We were working on a storyline for that when we came up with the ritual of having a Thanksgiving turkey. Everybody loved the idea!

Mechanic

We started iterating on that. Once the toy was decided, we moved onto the mechanic of the game. Being a fun event, we decided the game should be multiplayer. Soon we decided the turkey should be controlled by two people. We decided to use two controllers to move the turkey in space and escape from humans. One guest would control the right wings/feet of the turkey and the other guest would control the left. If someone moved only to the left, the turkey would spin around in that direction and vice versa.

The next challenge was to get the right camera angle to do the same. We discussed between first person and third person camera and finally settled on how the third person camera made more sense for this game as the guests had to see the humans chasing after them.

IMG_1210

Level Design

We soon broke off into groups and started working on all the requirements. In the mean time, couple of us worked out a level design for the game where the turkey would start the game in the dining room and had to work its way through the house to get to escape from the same.

Final Game

This was what came out of the 48 hours of development – Turkesh

screen_shot_2016-01-31_at_9-28-54_am2_223

Download Link – http://globalgamejam.org/2016/games/turkesh

5 thoughts on “First Global Game Jam

  1. This was my first game jam as well! I thoroughly enjoyed it and looks like you did too. Which got me thinking, did we fare better than regular first timers because we had BVW behind us? It just felt that we had all the deadlines in control and were mentally prepared for the ordeal even though it was physically exhausting. There was no point at which my team panicked or burned out completely. And scrapping ideas and mechanics on the fly wasn’t very painful as well. I guess rapid prototyping is one of those things that grows on you the more experience you have with it.

    As for your game, it was fun to watch but I only played it on my desktop. There’s a bug where I can’t exit the home (maybe I’m doing something wrong) but it was super easy on a keyboard. However, everyone else told me it was really hard. It’s interesting how the same game can scale up in difficulty just by changing the controls and the number of players involved. Definitely an easier solution compared to changing the world itself!

  2. Wow, your post is very similar to mine! Your brainstorming session looks insane haha. Did you guys really all write at the same time or was that a staged picture? (I really can’t tell) I’m curious what happened to the tooth fairy idea though – from what you wrote, it seems like you guys fleshed out that idea quite a bit. I would also have liked to see how you guys came up with the level design. Overall, I think your game is a pretty fun one to play which really requires communication to succeed. Good job!

  3. I don’t remember why we dropped the tooth fairy idea. The idea was fun but we could not build a full-fledged game around it. And nope, the photo wasn’t posed. But then again, it wasn’t to generate ideas. It was for something else. But it serves the narrative 😛

  4. It’s nice that your game is made for multiple players to work cooperatively, rather than competitively; it seems like the majority of multiplayer games all pit the players against each other (probably because introducing competition is an easy to add challenge, and it happens to work). But I like the idea of having multiple people work together to control a single character/object, it seems like an unusual challenge that would be both fun to play with and probably frustrating (in a good way).

  5. I know you folks had a great time during the game jam! Congrats on your first ever hackathon event that too a game jam at the ETC!! The post is really a fun read with a step by step walk-through that you provided. It was really interesting and intriguing to read about some of the things you mentioned. The images helped a lot, brings more life to the entire post, something I try to do but just lazy out 
    I wish you had mentioned a bit more about your experience, what things you tried and how was it working with all guys  Usually in my experience if it’s an all guy team – you end up with the most craziest shit ever!! The ideas that you folks came up supports that 😀
    I would like to know how the team strength affected the experience, would you suggest going with a 5 man team or maybe a smaller number would be better? Overall a good walk-through, lot of fun elements, and good mix of images to support the post; I want to play that game!!!

    Wait the game was named Turkesh!! Good lord 😛

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